The Lego school

[www.theatlantic.com/technolog...](http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/05/would-you-send-your-kid-to-the-lego-school/276254/)

Kirk Kristiansen is the rather wealthy grandson of the founder of Lego. In the Danish town of Billund, Kristiansen has built many Lego-inspired, children-centred, like Legoland or some playground filled with rubberised toys. 

But now, he is aiming for something bigger, the Lego school:

The campus will feature bicycle routes, learning labs, music studios, and playgrounds. And also, yes, lots of Legos. As the school explains of its approach to what it calls “Systematic Creativity,”

When the Lego system is used in a learning environment young people become creative, active and collaborative learners. They take ownership and are self-driven. They express their originality. They also learn from the interpreted experiences of other people as they share their ideas. They learn by reflecting on experiences and discussing how things work and they help each other to learn through the shared language of the brick.

Will Nordic countries keep revolutionising how kids should be thought, this time helped by Legos? Or will this turn out much worse than expected? 

We’ll know in about 20 years, I guess. See if Warston is still going to be there.